TO EACH, THEIR OWN

TO EACH, THEIR OWN

The transfer window across most of Europe is now shut after the August 31 deadline. The major leagues have all had to conclude their businesses through the registration of new players with the respective league can still occur.

 

 

However, certain countries like Turkey, Ukraine, Russia and others have their windows open during which they can continue to make signings from abroad as well as among the leagues. FootTheBall explains how different countries can set different deadlines for each.

 

WHAT DOES FIFA SAY

The world’s governing body states that “Associations may fix different registration periods for their male and female competitions.”

Given the rule of having two transfer windows during one season, the rules are that the first one has to start after the completion of the previous footballing season. If it has to start by overlapping the ongoing campaign, then it cannot run concurrently for more than four weeks.

 

 

FIFA will fix the time period for any association that fails to communicate its desire in time which is almost never the case. Moreover, the individual federations have to tell FIFA one year in advance when they would like to have next season’s period. The summer transfer window as the first one is often called, can run for a maximum of 12 weeks from its starting date.

 

 

The second transfer window is generally held during the middle of each league’s respective campaign and cannot exceed 4 weeks. Free-agent signings can be made prior to the beginning of the window but the player can only begin playing during the upcoming season. Similarly, free agents whose contracts expire before the end of the window can still sign on for new clubs even after the deadline day.

 

DIFFERENT DATES ACROSS EUROPE

The full list of countries where transfer windows are still going on are:

 

Czech Republic

Israel

Romania

Russia

Serbia

Slovakia

Turkey

Ukraine

 

 

According to the “Competitions Overview 2020-21” submitted jointly by all the member countries in Europe, one can understand that the start date for each league’s transfer window is different and they run for varying lengths of time. Since it is decided by each football federation, there is often little uniformity when it comes to the beginning and end.

 

 

Going by the nations listed above, here are the full details of this year’s first transfer window for each team.

 

Czech Republic: June 21-September 8 (~10 weeks)

Israel: June 23-September 14 (8 weeks)

Romania: June 15-September 6 (11 weeks)

Russia: June 28-September 7 (~10 weeks)

Serbia: June 28-September 17 (~10 weeks)

Slovakia: June 15-September 6 (11 weeks)

Turkey: June 17-September 8 (11 weeks)

Ukraine: July 1-September 3 (~8 weeks)

 

Thus, though the respective league campaigns end within May to early June, most of these federations have kept the start of their transfer windows a bit late. Compared to the rest of Europe, including the major leagues which start their windows either during the first week of June or even have shorter periods of time overall as in Spain which comprises July and August only.

 

 

There might be some important moves made by clubs whose leagues have closed the window in offloading fringe players. Chelsea still need to sort out the futures of Malang Sarr, Ross Barkley, Lewis Baker and Charly Musonda, all of whom had been left out of their Premier League squad registration.

Meanwhile, Barcelona are also trying to work a loan deal with Besiktas for Miralem Pjanic. More deals could be in the offing as the end date of these leagues gets closer.

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